YouTube – The Story of Stuff

Great video about the true cost of the stuff we buy and throw out:

YouTube – The Story of Stuff.

I absolutely love this.  Yes, people have argued with some of her statistics, and she argues that she had to simplify things to synthesize years of research into a twenty-minute video.  One can always find fault, but I think this is brilliant.  I have been aware for a while that I buy more stuff than I need and that much of it is made in sweatshops and winds up in landfills (sometimes again in developing nations).  The guilt is assuaged, however, by recycling the plastic and cardboard that either make the item or package it.  I’ve also been aware of the sleazy advertising tactics to get us to buy things.  But as a woman, I do want to look nice, so while I don’t want to buy into the corporate consumer frenzy, I also don’t want wrinkles or yellow teeth or boring shoes.  There are many products I buy because they make me feel good, and that outweighs the moral righteousness of abstaining.  It’s also difficult when faced with a purchase to visualize the damage done by the making and transporting of the product.  This video’s analysis of the whole cycle really brought it deep into my subconscious–this cycle is deeply wrong and that it is possible for us to start to step off the crazy treadmill.  I haven’t cut down my purchasing to where it probably should be, but I am making progress–at least asking myself more questions before I buy something, to examine whether it’s worth it on a global scale.

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